This is an RSS Feed courtesy of the Atlanta Journal Constitution for the duration of the crisis.

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By now we are all familiar with the drill: frequent hand washing (especially soap and water); social distancing (6 feet); no handshaking, fist bumps, high-fives or hugs—elbow bumps only; self-quarantine with any kind of cold symptoms; cancel cruise plans for at least a month or two; and try …

Issuing a shelter-in-place mandate that temporarily alters the daily lives of the state’s 10.6 million residents, Gov. Brian Kemp abandoned his earlier declarations that the coronavirus pandemic did not require the extreme measures in Georgia

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Violence, threats and substandard medical care are all part of the so-called “rehabilitation” process in our prisons. After all they are criminals so why concern ourselves with their well-being. Ignoring or even not caring about this class of people isn’t an unpopular point of view. So it should be no surprise that for the 53,000-plus inmates in Georgia prisons, the total medical staff consists of about 50 physicians who are employed by Georgia Correctional HealthCare (which contracts with the Georgia Department of Corrections (GDOC) to provide medical services to the state’s prisons). In fact, a 2014 investigation by the AJC, found that one in five Georgia prison doctors were hired despite State disciplinary orders for substandard care and other transgressions.